To Hold You in My Arms Again

A Great War wedding. One wonders what happened to them all.

A Great War wedding. One wonders what happened to them all.

When Circumstances Keep Us Apart

The other night I watched The Water Diviner…for the second time – a typical fate of mine when drawn into a story, removing myself away from the critics and enjoying someone’s vision. As I sat with my Rosemary I watched for her reactions to the words, images and soundtrack that brings this story together and allows us to react to it. I think upon my own time on the Gallipoli Peninsula (many years after the conflict) – I feel the heat, relive the heights of scrambles, cliffs and trails, and search in the silence the will of nations as metal cut through the spaces in between in search of their quarry.

It is the separation of family that I am drawn to today so richly echoed in this film. I see it also in the images from this time, Great War weddings, portrait photographs, family with children and all the time I wonder. What did these eyes see? Were they ever to see one and other again? Who were they…and marvel that, despite not knowing them, it is their dreams or concerns for the future that is reflected in their eyes. As Dr. Ibrahim (Ayshe’s father) tells us in the film, “I can see it in his eyes.”

Studio portrait of a soldier. A popular item to send home to loved ones.

Studio portrait of a soldier. A popular item to send home to loved ones.

And so when circumstances keep us apart, to hold you in my arms again, is a story that never grows old and one for all of us to share. Like the film’s Major Hasan reminds us, “Some things should never be forgotten”. Enjoy the film’s final soundtrack, (Love Was My Alibi – Kris Fogelmark). There is magic in this and happy birthday to my girl Rosemary…..

 


About The Author

pferguson
Paul has worked with the Paradigm Motion Picture Company since 2009 as producer, historian and research specialist. Paul first met Casey and Ian WIlliams of Paradigm in April 2007 at Ieper (Ypres), Belgium when ceremonies were being held for the re-dedication of the Vimy Memorial, France. Paul's sensitivity to film was developed at an early age seeing his first films at RCAF Zweibrucken, Germany and in Sardinia. Paul returned to Canada in 1967 and was further amazed by David Lean's "Lawrence of Arabia" and "Bridge on the River Kwai". Film captivated Paul and with time he became increasingly interested in storytelling, content development, character, direction, cinematography and soundtracks. At the University of Victoria, Paul studied and compared Japanese and Australian film and became interested in Australian film maker Peter Weir and his film "Gallipoli" (1981). Paul was entranced when he learned Weir had visited the beaches, ridges and ravines of the peninsula. The film "Gallipoli" alone led Paul on many journeys to sites of conflict in England, France, Belgium, Holland, Germany, Malta, Hawaii and Gallipoli. It was, however, when Paul watched documentary filmmaker Ken Burns, "The Civil War", that Paul understood how his own experience and insight could be effective and perhaps influential in film-making. Combining his knowledge of Museums and Archives, exhibitions and idea strategies with his film interests would be a natural progression. Paul thinks like a film-maker. His passion for history and storytelling brings to Paradigm an eye (and ear) to the keen and sensitive interests of; content development, the understanding of successful and relational use of collections, imagery and voice. Like Paul's favorite actor, Peter O'Toole, he believes in the adage “To deepen not broaden.” While on this path Paul always remembers his grandmother whose father did not return from the Great War and how his loss shaped her life and how her experience continues to guide him.

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