Tamzine!

| July 19, 2017

Tempest and Tranquility Less than 15’ in length the 1937-constructed Tamzine is believed to be the smallest of the little ships that set forth to the beaches of Dunkirk where it helped save soldiers of the British Expeditionary Force; many of whom would fight on these shores again and across Northwest Europe. Tamzine, built of Canadian […]

Help the Scottish Women’s Hospitals

| June 11, 2017

The National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies [NUWSS] Elsie Inglis who initially studied medicine at the Edinburgh School of Medicine in 1887, completed her studies in 1892 at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Inglis was especially cognizant of the required specialized knowledge and treatments for female patients and was appalled by the lack of standards turning […]

Recognizing Bravery

| September 10, 2015

The Ordinary with the Extraordinary All nations have their awards and many of these symbols of valour (valor), honour (honor), bravery, and courage are well known. They take on many names such as the Victoria Cross, the Légion d’Honneur, Croix de Guerre, Ritterkreuz (Iron Cross), and the Medal of Honor. In earlier times, gallantry was […]

We Are Parts of Many Things

| August 16, 2015

A Journey and Study of Context It was a curious thing I set out upon.   Having traveled many times to London, England and ventured forth from various rail stations to different parts of the United Kingdom, I took on more and more the role of the observer of place. These built structures and landscapes […]

Dad’s Army: The Man (Men) and the Hour

| July 27, 2013

What Black and White Film Can Do! Dad’s Army the well-known British Home Guard sitcom played from 1968 – 1977  with the first two series, of nine, being filmed in black and white. Recently I sat down and watched Series 1 Episode 1, The Man and the Hour, and chuckled my way through the dialogue. I […]